Unsecured Note

A debt instrument or a loan that is not secured (covered by collateral) by the assets of the issuer of the note

What is an Unsecured Note?

An unsecured note is basically a debt instrument or a loan that is not secured (covered by collateral) by the assets of the issuer of the note. An unsecured note is typically a corporate debt obligation.

 

Unsecured Note

 

In the spectrum of finance and investment, a note is primarily a legal financial document or a contract that serves as an acknowledgment of debt (prominently referred to as an IOU) from a borrower to the lender.

It is a contractual legal obligation that is taken up by the issuer to repay the lender or the investor the principal amount borrowed, along with additional interest payments, at an agreed date or periodic intervals agreed upon.

 

Summary

  • An unsecured note is basically a debt instrument or a loan that is not secured (covered by collateral) by the assets of the issuer of the note.
  • Since the risk level associated with unsecured notes is high, the reward, i.e., the return to be received on the debt, is also relatively higher.
  • An unsecured note comes with a typical longevity of three to ten years.

 

Features of Unsecured Notes

 

1. Risk level

The risk level is fairly high when it comes to unsecured notes – because of the very reason that they’re unsecured. There is no collateral to back the notes up. The debt is not secured by the issuer’s assets, thereby increasing the level of risk associated with the debt.

Whenever the risk is higher, the reward is higher. In the world of finance, everything follows the principle of “the greater the risk, the higher the reward.” The same applies to unsecured notes. Since the risk level associated with such a type of debt is high, the reward, i.e., the return to be received on the debt, is also relatively higher.

 

2. Time period

Unsecured notes are typically structured for a predetermined fixed time period. Along with the time period, the periodic interest intervals are also predetermined.

 

3. Exchange of notes

Unsecured notes are exchanged in the corporate arena through private offerings. It helps generate money for corporate ventures, including share repurchase, mergers and acquisitions, and so on.

 

4. Time frame

An unsecured note comes with a typical longevity of three to ten years in the corporate arena.

 

5. Uninsured

Unsecured notes are often uninsured debt securities, i.e., there is no debt insurance backing the lender if the borrower defaults to pay the principal.

 

6. Trading

Unsecured notes are very difficult to trade because of the fact that they are unsecured. The notes are exchanged solely on the basis of the lender’s faith in the borrower, as there is no collateral or even insurance backing the debt.

The lender’s faith in the borrower is personal and may not be reciprocated by other lenders or investors in the market. Hence, the notes are very difficult to actively trade in the market compared to secured notes, promissory notes, or bonds.

 

Are Unsecured Notes the Same as Debentures?

Unsecured notes can often be mistaken to be similar to debentures because the latter is also a form of unsecured corporate debt. However, while there are some superficial similarities between unsecured notes and debentures, the debt instruments are very different from one another.

Unsecured notes are similar to debentures in the sense that debentures are also one kind of unsecured corporate debt. the risk level is also high with debentures because they are unsecured. In addition, since the risk level is high, the interest rate or the rate of return is also relatively higher.

However, unsecured notes are typically uninsured debt instruments. On the other hand, debentures generally carry insurance policies that secure the lender or the investor in case the borrower defaults on their obligation.

 

More Resources

CFI offers the Certified Banking & Credit Analyst (CBCA)™ certification program for those looking to take their careers to the next level. To keep learning and developing your knowledge base, please explore the additional relevant resources below:

  • Collateralized Debt Obligation (CDO)
  • Promissory Note
  • Quality of Collateral
  • Structured Note