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Annual Turnover

A measurement to describe a fund’s annual trading activity

What is an Annual Turnover?

Annual turnover is a measurement to describe a fund’s annual trading activity. It is a percentage used to demonstrate how many holdings a mutual fund or exchange-traded funds (ETF) were replaced within the year.

 

Annual Turnover

 

Essentially, the annual turnover will help to show the purchase or sale of securities within a mutual fund or ETF portfolio. When a mutual fund or exchange-traded fund sells or buys, the fund’s annual turnover ratio will increase.

If it is higher, then the fund is being more actively managed. On the other hand, if the annual turnover is low, it can be concluded that the fund is being managed passively.

 

Summary

  • Annual turnover is a measurement to describe a fund’s annual trading activity – purchases and selling of securities annually.
  • It can be low or high, depending on how the mutual fund or ETF is being managed – actively managed or passively managed.
  • To calculate the turnover ratio, divide the amount of new securities purchased and the amount of securities sold by the total assets under management within the mutual fund or the ETF. It will give a percentage amount and can be used to describe the turnover of a fund annually.

 

Mutual Funds and Exchange-Traded Funds (ETFs)

Mutual funds can be explained as open-end investment funds that are managed by finance professionals. Money is pooled from a multitude of investors and put towards the purchase of securities, such as stocks or bonds. It is attractive to some investors because of professional management, diversification factor, and low pricing.

Exchange-traded funds (ETFs) are a kind of investment fund that includes securities such as stocks or commodities but is traded on an exchange. Similar to mutual funds, ETFs are attractive to investors because of low costs, but also their efficiency with regards to taxation.

The main differences between ETFs and mutual funds are in their costs, taxation, and trading. Since ETFs are traded on an exchange, they are usually subject to fees such as brokerage commissions.

However, ETFs, in general, are known for offering lower costs overall than mutual funds. ETFs are also considered more tax-efficient since they are not redeemed by the holders themselves, and they sell their shares on the stock market.

 

Calculating the Turnover Ratio

To calculate the turnover ratio, divide the amount of new securities purchased and the amount of securities sold by the total assets under management within the mutual fund or the ETF. It will give you a percentage amount and can be used to describe the turnover of a fund annually. The mathematical expression is given below:

 

Turnover Ratio - Formula

 

If the ratio shows 100%, it means all positions within the ETF or mutual funds were bought and sold over the past year. If there is a low turnover percentage, one can deduce a hold strategy.

Overall, the turnover rate calculation will demonstrate the extent of the changes in the fund’s holdings over the past year.

 

Why is Annual Turnover Important?

Annual turnover is important for a couple of reasons. It is important for potential and current investors because they should look into whether the fund they are investing in is being actively or passively managed. Determining the annual turnover ratio will help to discover this.

Investors need to analyze the annual turnover to ensure that they understand the additional costs involved if, for example, the fund is being managed actively. Extra costs related to additional transaction costs, such as brokerage fees, will affect an investor’s overall investment returns.

Furthermore, a higher annual turnover can result in negative tax implications. If there are additional profitable trades, there will be more taxable income.

Overall, the main importance regarding annual turnover involves the possibility of higher costs from taxation and increasing trading, which can affect the overall investment returns depending on the situation of the investor and what they are looking for.

 

Annual Turnover – Example

A mutual fund invests in 200 stocks. Throughout the year 2020, 150 of them are replaced. It results in an annual turnover ratio of 75%. It is a high turnover for a mutual fund and can, therefore, be defined as a more actively managed fund.

 

Related Readings

CFI is the official provider of the global Certified Banking & Credit Analyst (CBCA)™ certification program, designed to help anyone become a world-class financial analyst. To keep advancing your career, the additional resources below will be useful:

  • Investment Methods
  • Trading Securities
  • Open-end vs. Closed-end Mutual Funds
  • Asset Turnover Ratio

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