Learn 100% online from anywhere in the world. Enroll today!

Average Daily Rate (ADR)

A performance indicator used in the hospitality sector to measure the strength of revenues generated

What is the Average Daily Rate (ADR)?

The average daily rate (ADR) is a performance indicator used in the hospitality sector to measure the strength of revenues generated. It is measured as the total revenues generated by all the occupied rooms in a hotel or lodge divided by the total number of occupied rooms over a given time period. It is a simple average that shows the revenues generated per occupied room.

 

Average Daily Rate

 

Summary

  • The average daily rate (ADR) is a useful tool to maximize revenues in the hospitality sector.
  • The ADR measured as the total revenues generated by all the occupied rooms in the hotel or lodge divided by the total number of occupied rooms over a given time period.
  • The average daily rate includes only the occupied rooms and not the total available stock.

 

Formula for the Average Daily Rate

 

Average Daily Rate - Formula

 

Importance of Average Daily Rate

  1. The average daily rate allows comparison across time periods and also a cross-section of peers to help the hotel operator ascertain the key trends, emerging challenges, and, consequently, a change of strategy if needed.
  2. ADR can be used for initiating strategic choices, such as using promotions to boost occupancy or increase prices to maximize revenues.
  3. The average daily rate also provides a metric to check how well each geographic stratum does with respect to revenue generation. For prudent comparison, we must select peers closely matched in terms of size, location, and clientele.
  4. If a property generates a lower average daily rate compared to its peers, then the company can look deeper into the root cause of the problem. Based on the ratio, the problem can be that the number of rooms occupied is large, which means the revenue charged per room is small.
  5. However, it can also be the case that the prices charged per room is very high, which is leading to lower occupancy with an optically higher ADR.
  6. The average daily rate is a very useful tool to calibrate the room rate to maximize not just revenues but profits as well.

 

Examples of ADR

 

1. Local competition

Consider a hotel named A with 100 rooms near a warm tropical beach. On a particular day, 80 rooms are occupied and, for simplicity, assume that all the rooms are of the same configuration. The total revenue per day is $4,000.

Total revenue per day = $10,000

Number of rooms occupied = 80

Average Daily Rate (ADR) = $10,000 / 80 = $125

 

An ADR of $125 per day is of no use. However, if we know that the ADR for the previous day was $100, then we can ascertain how efficiently each of the occupied rooms is generating revenues.

Also, suppose the nearby Hotel B reports an ADR of $200, then Hotel A now needs to understand what is causing the increase for its competitor. There are two possible reasons: (1) less number of rooms occupied or (2) per room rates are higher.

  1. In the first case, higher ADR is certainly not desirable because the hotel industry faces a lot of fixed costs, such as leases, employee expenses, and establishment charges. Lower occupancy denotes that the lumpy fixed expense gets spread over a large universe of rooms and hence is sustainable.

The second case shows that Hotel B enjoys some competitive advantage, which is allowing it to charge higher rates. The advantage can be pleasant views, better ambiance, or something as mundane as world-class service.

 

2. Seasonal business

Consider a ski resort located in the North American Rockies. Skiing is a seasonal recreational activity, and hence a ski resort would report highly seasonal revenues. A typical skiing season lasts for five to six months per year. The average daily rate over the prime skiing season would be a key metric to track the performance of the resort.

Suppose there are 100 rooms. Over a six-month period during the high season, the occupancy rate was 75%. The average daily revenue was $18,750.

Total revenue per day = $18,750

Number of rooms occupied = 100 x 75% = 75

Average Daily Rate (ADR) = $18,750 / 75 = $250 (during the skiing season)

 

Additional Resources

CFI offers the Certified Banking & Credit Analyst (CBCA)™ certification program for those looking to take their careers to the next level. To keep learning and developing your knowledge base, please explore the additional relevant resources below:

  • Average Revenue Per User (ARPU)
  • Current Income (Real Estate Investments)
  • Hospitality REIT
  • Market Share

Free Accounting Courses

Learn accounting fundamentals and how to read financial statements with CFI’s free online accounting classes.
These courses will give the confidence you need to perform world-class financial analyst work. Start now!

 

Building confidence in your accounting skills is easy with CFI courses! Enroll now for FREE to start advancing your career!