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Mortgage

A loan provided by a mortgage lender or a bank that enables an individual to purchase a home

What is a Mortgage?

A mortgage is a loan – provided by a mortgage lender or a bank – that enables an individual to purchase a home. While it’s possible to take out loans to cover the entirety of a home, it’s generally most advantageous to secure a loan that’s worth about 80% of the home’s value or less.

 

Mortgage

 

The loan must be paid back over time. The physical home purchased acts as collateral on the money an individual is lent to purchase the home.

 

Types of Mortgages

The two most common types of mortgages are fixed-rate and adjustable-rate (also known as variable rate) mortgages.

 

Fixed-Rate Mortgages

Fixed-rate mortgages provide borrowers with an established interest rate over a set term of typically 15, 20, or 30 years. With a fixed interest rate, the shorter the term over which the borrower pays, the higher the monthly payment. Conversely, the longer the borrower takes to pay, the smaller the monthly repayment amount. However, the longer it takes to repay the loan, the more the borrower ultimately spends on interest payments.

The greatest advantage of a fixed-rate mortgage is that the borrower can count on their monthly mortgage payments being the same every month, making it easier to set household budgets and preventing any unexpected additional charges from one month to the next. Even if market rates change significantly – specifically if/when they increase – the borrower doesn’t need to make higher monthly payments.

 

Adjustable-Rate Mortgages

Adjustable-rate mortgages (ARMs) come with interest rates that can – and usually, do – change over the life of the loan. Increases in market rates and other factors cause interest rates to fluctuate, which changes the amount of interest the borrower must pay, and therefore changes the total monthly payment due. With adjustable rate mortgages, the interest rate is set to be reviewed and adjusted at specific times. For example, the rate may be adjusted once a year or once every six months.

One of the most popular adjustable-rate mortgages is the 5/1 ARM, which offers a fixed rate for the first five years of the repayment period, with the interest for the remainder of the loan’s life subject to rises and falls and adjusted annually.

While ARMs makes it more difficult for the borrower to gauge spending and establish their monthly budgets, they are popular because they typically come with lower starting interest rates than fixed-rate mortgages. Borrowers, assuming their income will grow over time, may seek an ARM in order to lock in a low fixed-rate in the beginning, when they are earning less.

The primary risk with an ARM is that interest rates may increase significantly over the life of the loan, to a point where the mortgage payments become so high that they are difficult for the borrower to meet and may even lead to default and the borrower losing the home through foreclosure.

Mortgages are major financial commitments, locking borrowers into decades of payments that must be made on a consistent basis. However, most people believe that the long-term benefits of homeownership make committing to a mortgage worthwhile.

 

mortgage types and payments

 

Mortgage Payments

Mortgage payments usually occur on a monthly basis and consist of four main parts:

 

1. Principal

The principal is the total amount of the loan given. For example, if an individual takes out a $250,000 mortgage to purchase a home, then the principal loan amount is $250,000. Lenders typically like to see a 20% down payment on the purchase of a home. So, if the $250,000 mortgage represents 80% of the home’s appraised value, then the homebuyers would be making a down payment of $62,500, and the total purchase price of the home would be $312,500.

 

2. Interest

The interest is the monthly percentage added to each mortgage payment. Lenders and banks don’t simply loan individuals money without expecting to get something in return. Interest is the money a lender or bank makes back on the money they provide to homebuyers.

 

3. Taxes

The property tax the individual must pay as a homeowner. Taxes are calculated based on the value of the home.

 

4. Insurance

Includes homeowner’s insurance, which is required by lenders to cover damage to the home (which acts as collateral), as well as the property inside of it. It also covers specific mortgage insurance, which is generally required if an individual makes a down payment that is less than 20% of the home’s cost. Mortgage insurance is designed to protect the lender or bank if the borrower defaults on his or her loan.

 

Additional Resources

CFI is the official provider of the global Financial Modeling & Valuation Analyst certification program, designed to help anyone become a world-class financial analyst. The following resources will be helpful in furthering your financial education:

  • Cost of Debt
  • Floating Interest Rate
  • Interest Payable
  • Real Estate

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